nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

Reblog / posted 15 hours ago via npr · © nprbooks with 1,708 notes

thevvintersolder:

fun fact: if you say ‘bucky barnes is a villain’ three times into a mirror then steve rogers will appear and punch you in the face


bagellie:

benefits of being friends with me

  • shitty jokes whenever you ask for them
  • shitty jokes whenever you don’t ask for them

ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »


stonefoxie:

“It’s beautiful to be alone. To be alone does not mean to be lonely. It means the mind is not influenced and contaminated by society.”
—  Jiddu Krishnamurti

stonefoxie:

“It’s beautiful to be alone. To be alone does not mean to be lonely. It means the mind is not influenced and contaminated by society.”

Jiddu Krishnamurti


"Don’t fool yourself. English isn’t inherently superior, or easier to learn, or more sonically pleasing. Its international usage comes from forceful assimilation and legacy of colonialistic injection. It isn’t a deed that one should take pride in."
— my uncle left this comment on his friend’s Facebook status, a white British man who was bragging about how easy it is to be a native English speaker when trekking to different nations. (via maarnayeri)

This is my just-turned-in-my-last-academic-paper-ever-hopefully selfie

This is my just-turned-in-my-last-academic-paper-ever-hopefully selfie


shardsofblu:

"Not a perfect soldier, but a good man."

Steve Rogers may be a superhuman who could jump off planes without parachutes, but he’s also just a kid from Brooklyn. 

Clark Kent may be a god who shoots fire from his eyes, but he’s also just a farm boy from Smallville.

"Make a better world than ours."

Steve Rogers, orphaned and frail and impoverished, who would speak up when nobody would, who would fight and claw at bullies twice his own size, who would throw himself over a rogue grenade to protect his comrades. 

Clark Kent, lost and hated and rejected, who would risk exposure rather than stop helping people, who would let bullies punch him rather than hurt them, who would inspire his own tormentor because of kindness instead of bitterness.

They do not become Superman or Captain America because of that emblazoned S or that star-spangled shield. But because of who they are before the world gets to know them. Because of who they are since the very beginning of their stories, and who they have continued to be, despite all the struggles and difficulties.


iwillbe-0verjoyed:

If you think instrumental music is stupid you can decrescendo out of my life


saddeer:

zkac:

what’s Whitney Houston’s favorite type of coordination?

HAAAAAAAAAND EYEEEEEEEEEE

i hate this i hate u 

Reblog / posted 1 day ago via xenxilla · © zkac with 110,934 notes